What Black Lives Matter Means:  Rochester’s Black Lives Matter at School and The Importance of Education

blm-at-school
Courtesy of WHEC Rochester

 

 

Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom.
—George Washington Carver

 

On February 17, 2017, history unfolded in schools throughout the Rochester City School District when students were introduced to Black Lives Matter at School, an educational initiative dedicated to generating discussions about Black lives.

BLM at School was the social justice brainchild of parent/activist Mahreen Mustafa George, local organizer Afro-Latinx Queen, Rochester city activists, and teachers.  “I got involved after our varsity boys’ soccer team took a knee during the playing of the national anthem during one of their games,” explained George, whose children are RCSD students. “A few weeks later, schools and educators in Seattle Public schools took steps to affirm and understand that Black Lives Matter and they garnered national news coverage. Myself and the other founding members talked about this action and it led to us saying that we needed to sit down together and see if we could do something similar here in the RCSD, given that our community was already taking part in actions supporting racial justice.”

“BLM at School,” stated Afro Latinx Queen, “is about having the opportunity to have difficult conversations in the classroom and guiding the dialogue for it to be more productive and not traumatizing for either party and learning about restorative practice.”

The organizers reached out to schools such as World of Inquiry School to introduce BLM at School into the classrooms.  Teachers, parents, community members, and even former students participated in this initiative, using peace circles to connect with pupils about a wide range of topics pertaining to Black empowerment. Those involved also had the opportunity to discuss oppression, how it affects people of color, and solutions to eradicate it.   In the Black Lives Matter at School Facebook group, participants proudly uploaded footage of students actively listening, engaging with one another and the volunteers while discussing the politics affecting Black people regularly.

The BLM at School committee studied various resources and curriculums, including the BLM at School Week in Philadelphia.  In early 2017, many teachers in the city’s schools incorporated activities into their lessons throughout the week, introducing everything from “science lessons about the biology of skin color for high schoolers” to “The Revolution Is Always Now” coloring pages for very young students.”  Unlike the initiative here in Rochester, the one in Philly was neither sponsored by the school district.  However, it opened the door for a much-needed discussion about the importance of Black liberation.

As groundbreaking (and well meaning) as BLM at School is, it was also considered controversial.  Like any incentive focused on social justice, BLM at School experienced some resistance from some educators, administrators, and even the members of the Rochester community.  Many White parents expressed their concerns or overall distain about BLM at School, arguing that 1) it was associated with the national movement and 2) that the event itself would promote violence—particularly against law enforcement.  It was furthermore considered divisive by alienating White people, who proposed an “All Lives Matter at School” Day.

And while a cluster of city schools openly embraced BLM at School, there were some who did not.  In fact, one school was so resistant to the activity that threatened the educational future of its students.  Brenda Pacheco, principal of Rochester’s School of the Arts, issued a statement threatening to suspend students who participated in a planned walk-out.  When the notification reached social media, members of the community inundated the school’s administration with emails, phone calls, and resistance.  Meanwhile, SOTA students exercised their right to peacefully protest by walking out minutes before dismissal, chanting alongside supportive community organizers.

As I watch the protest live on social media, I realized that the crux of the Black Lives Matter at School was to emphasize the importance of education.  The majority of schools in the United States do not properly teach the history of Black people or non-Black people of color.  In fact, students will more likely read some skewed version of how Abraham Lincoln freed the slaves with the Emancipation Proclamation.  Black students are rarely exposed to their own history, identity, and culture in the classroom, this exclusion of information deliberate on the part of the administration.

And the authority figures in urban school further play a significant role in how Black children view themselves.  It is no coincidence that most of the educators in city schools are White and uneducated about the systematic oppression inflicted upon the Black students they teach.  Many of these students reside in impoverished neighborhoods and live in unhealthy environments, not learning the coping skills necessary to overcome adversity—let alone their own history.  While struggling with adversity in their immediate environment, these students enter the classroom to consume information about people dissimilar to them.

Contributing to the disconnect is that these White educators often dismiss the intellect of their Black students.  White educators who do so compare these children to that of their White counterparts—possibly due to scientific racism.  Conversely, studies have shown that Black students benefit from engaging with Black teachers because the latter understands them and will more likely recognize their potential.

“A lot of our children of color are misunderstood,” explained Afro Latinx Queen, “mostly due to staff not knowing how to deal with our kids because they are uneducated about trauma within our communities. Instead they turn to feelings such as intimidation or fear.”

This is why I firmly believe that personal/political and even spiritual empowerment is the crux of systematic change.  When members of a disenfranchised group acknowledge their worth, they will employ every source within themselves to resist anyone, anything that states otherwise.  The SOTA students were educated enough to acknowledge the bullshit Pacheco tried to pull on them.  By studying on their own, researching Black Lives Matter and the incident that spearheaded the movement to begin with—on top of internalizing their own significance, they practiced their right to state that they mattered by engaging in civil disobedience.  But most importantly, these students also need supporters in the community to validate their efforts in regards to achieving empowerment.  It is paramount for educators, community members, parents, and even former students to collaborate with one another to ensure that BLM at School continues to thrive in the RCSD.

Black Lives Matter at School, to me, is an initiative that was a long time coming.  Black children need to know the accomplishments of their elders and contemporaries.  Because if our children knew their history, they will then become educated.  They would then inquire about the structure of their surroundings and who truly benefits.  And, once realizing the truth, the pupils become empowered to the point of wanting to challenge the various industrial complexes that oppress them.

The Same Fight: The Parallels Between Standing Rock and the Flint Water Crisis

 

About a couple of weeks ago, I was scrolling through my Facebook newsfeed when I suddenly stopped on this:

Flint Water Crisis.PNG

Right next to it was the question “Why aren’t we talking about this anymore?”

This was a reasonable questioning considering the consequences of the city government’s negligence.  Michigan Governor Rick Snyder issued an apology promising to provide a solution, but a significant amount of damage had already occurred. Even after a state of emergency was declared on both the state and federal level, Michigan state officials attempted to block efforts to switch the water supply from the Flint River.  Though they switched the water back to the Huron River this year, Flint residents still reside without suitable drinking water. They continuously rely on bottled water for basic necessities like showering and cooking.

Unsurprisingly, the tribulations inflicted upon the citizens of Flint greatly resembled that of the water protectors at the Standing Rock.  Since April 2016, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe protested the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.  The tribe argued the pipeline threatened to pollute the reservation’s water supply and ancient burial grounds.  Despite possessing an 1891 treaty, the United States Army Corps of Engineers planned to construct a pipeline in Lake Oahe.  What followed was #NoDAPL, a grassroots movement resisting the government’s efforts to damage the reservation’s only water source.

The more I researched the demonstration in Standing Rock and #NoDAPL, the more I discovered that the parallels with the Flint Water crisis was uncanny:

 

  • Capitalism involving a basic necessity

Capitalism was the foundation of the initiatives that affected both areas and its use of water.  In Flint, city government officials claimed Flint could no longer afford to purchase water from Detroit Water and Sewer Department.  Thus, to save $5 million over less than two years, the water supply was switched from Huron Lake to the heavily polluted Flint River, knowing it was contaminated with high levels of lead.  The irony was that the city ended up spending more money in the long run:  Governor Snyder sent $28 million to Flint for supplies, medical expenses, and infrastructure upgrades.  He also budgeted an additional $30 million to the city of Flint towards bill credits and local businesses. The City government officials also had to hire attorneys to combat the ongoing lawsuit pending against them.

As far as Standing Rock, the pipeline was nearly completed when the efforts were halted by the Sioux tribe, neighboring Native tribes, and protesters.  Though the Energy Transfer Partners and federal government officials claimed the supposed quality of the DAPL, history showed otherwise.  Numerous publications reported that these oil pipelines tended to burst and pollute the water source, leaving the water completely unusable.  In fact, The Huffington Post reported that the North Dakota oil pipeline exploded, leaking approximately 150 miles into the Ash Coulee Creek near Belfield.

 

  • Intentional Exclusion of the Citizens

In both controversies, the marginalized groups affected were deliberately excluded from the decision-making process.  The folks in Flint received no notification from city officials about the termination of Detroit Water and Sewer Department’s services, the change in water source, or the circumstances leading to their erroneous decision.  If anything, it wasn’t until brown water rushed from the tap that residents suspected that something was amiss. Despite outcry from the residents, Governor Snider and city officials insisted for two years that the water was safe to consume. Yet that was untrue and they were forced to admit that Flint River was contaminated. The City of Flint is predominately Black, so accusations of environmental racism soon surfaced. Considering the absence of urgency displayed and the assumption that the impoverished neighborhoods lacked the inner resources to protest, it is safe to conclude that this would have never gone down in the suburbs.

Historical, generational, and environmental oppression was prevalent throughout Standing Rock.  Not only were the Sioux tribal leaders unaware of the pipeline’s construction, but the tribe’s 1891 Treaty was violated courtesy of the state and federal government.  When the Sioux tribe filed a suit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in July, it was denied in September.  Unfortunately, the disregard of Native voices, their culture, and overall identity is all too normalized.  The Standing Rock Sioux reservation itself had been the result of an 1889 treaty violation. During the same period, tribal spiritual practices were under attack as government sanctioned security attempted to arrest those performing cleansing rituals on reservation property.  In the early 20th Century, Native children were abducted from their homes and forced to adopt Christian European conventions.  The list of atrocities against the Natives is extensive and rooted in White superiority—as is the history of racism and systematic oppression against Black people in regards to commodities.

 

  • Government involvement (or lack thereof)

The Flint water crisis and Standing Rock was supported by the federal government and that of their individual states.  As previously mentioned, city government officials made the decisions regarding the water supply switch.  Yet when investigators sent the Environmental Protection Agency reports on the Flint River’s contamination levels, the federal agency dismissed the results by declaring the water suitable for consumption. It took the controversy reaching a critical point and the mainstream media for the Obama Administration to finally intervene.  And it wasn’t like the federal and local government were oblivious the entire time.  Four government officials—including one from the Environmental Protection Agency—lost their employment due to their mishandling of the crisis.

In regards to Standing Rock, not only was the DAPL approved by the local government, but overseen by federal government factions such as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of the Interior, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation.  The Army Corps of Engineers greenlighted the pipeline project and attempted to disregard the sovereignty of the Sioux tribe.  Meanwhile, the Obama Administration did nothing to cease the Army Corps of Engineers’ efforts, only intervening (to some degree) when physical safety of water protectors became jeopardized.

 

  • Violation of human rights

The human violations in both areas were considered two of the worst my generation had ever witnessed, resembling dystopian short films.

In Flint, generations of children under the age of five were unknowingly poisoned with lead, which caused significant neurocognitive damage.  Due to the high levels of lead in the Flint River, approximately 6,000 to 12,000 children tested positive for high levels of lead poisoning.  In addition, ten people lost their lives to Legionnaires’ Disease while 77 were affected.  Citizens were denied assess even to contaminated water due to their justifiable refusal to pay the water bill.  Both a local and federal state of emergency was declared, but only after the mainstream and independent media highlighted the controversy. Though they switched the water supply back to Huron Lake two years later, the residents still alleged that the water was unsafe.

In Standing Rock, water protectors were mauled by security attack dogs, shot with rubber bullets, tear gas bombs, bulldozers, and long range acoustic devices that potentially damaged the hearing of some of the demonstrators.  The brutality resulted in many water protectors getting seriously injured, causing permanent physical damage in some instances:  Protestor Sophia Wilansky’s left arm was amputated after she was shot with a concussion grenade.  Standing Rock frontliner Vanessa Dondun (also known as Sioux Z) permanently lost sight in her right eye after a tear gas container struck her in the face.  Were it not for the Facebook Live feeds or independent news blog publications, the inhumanity inflicted upon tribal members and protectors would had gone unreported.

 

The Flint water crisis and the North Dakota pipeline are examples of what occurs when the government disregards the people.  The industrial complexes supposedly designed to enforce democracy chose to negate complete accountability for the well-being of those harmed until the situation reached a critical point.  Meanwhile, the citizens affected were either gaslighted into believing the poison destroying their bodies was imaginary or severely brutalized for resisting.  Similar resistance campaigns like the Civil Rights Movement, the Chicano Movement, the Red Power Movement and many others were spearheaded by people of color forced to protect their honor, right to basic needs, and to simply exist. Be that as it may, these efforts also made us resilient freedom fighters ready to defend what rightfully belonged to marginalized people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black Realism in Marvel’s Luke Cage

So let’s talk about Black television for a minute.

In an industry saturated with shows featuring predominately White cast-members, Black audiences are finally enjoying an influx of Black prime-time entertainment. Courtesy of powerhouses such as filmmaker Ava DuVernay and Writer/Producer Shonda Rhimes, programs like How to Get Away with Murder, Empire, Queen Sugar, Being Mary Jane are discussed on social media threads.  Among these dramas, though, is one caught and retained my attention:

Luke Cage.

Based on the Marvel comic book series, The show chronicles Luke Cage, a reserved, elusive, thoughtful Black man with unbreakable skin and immortality.  Before the groundbreaking web series debuted on Netflix on September 30, activists and comic book geeks anticipated its arrival. While many folks discussed the differences between the comic and more modernized version of the characters, others focused on the show’s political significance.  I myself shared the official trailer on my Facebook page, geeking out while watching actor Michael Colter calmly approached his adversaries as bullets ricocheted off his chest.

Yet when I was finally able to watch the series (Netflix crashed on the day Luke Cage debuted), I wasn’t ready for the pro-Blackness that played on my laptop screen.  Everything from the Black political literature to the music spoke to me.  Its blaxplotation-que references apologizes for the actual 1970s films that caricatured us and African culture.  Luke’s strength and immortality represents the resilience of Black people in general (and with the current political climate, I needed that reminder that we are survivors).  But what I truly appreciate is how the storylines in Luke Cage parallels the reality of Black people.

Let’s start with the origin of Luke’s abilities—how and where he gains them.  Known as Carl Lucas, Luke is imprisoned for a crime he hasn’t committed.  And while locked up, he obtains super powers when a cellular regeneration experiment goes horribly awry.  The fact that Luke’s in jail for absolutely nothing accurately reflects how the judicial and prison system targets Black people. According to the recent Federal Bureau of Prisons statistics, Black men are 5.1 more times likely than their male counterparts to be incarcerated in a federal prison.  As far as Black women, the number of Black women prison has increased to 700% between the years 1980 and 2014.  In fact, they are most likely to be placed behind bars, according to the Bureau of Justice.

There’s also the fact that Luke is experimented on against his will. In the episode “Step in the Arena,” Dr. Reva Connors assures Luke and the other inmates in her support group that no experimentations are being conducted at Seagate Penitentiary.   However, that turns out not to be the case.  In reality, government regulations prohibit prisoners and other vulnerable populations from being experimented on without written consent.  Until well into the 1970s, however, Black prisoners and mental health patients are used as test subjects, usually given false information by White researchers conducting these experiments.  This has caused the deaths of many poor Black people who’ve been injected with cancer cells and other deceases.  This is one of the many reasons why—to this day—Black folks distrusts the medical profession.

Speaking of professions, this brings me to the portrayal of law enforcement on the show. And just the cops on the show, there are those in real life who are secretly employed by crime lords.  If y’all watch documentaries like “Mr. Untouchable” and “Cocaine Cowboys,” there are numerous accounts of officers getting paid for doing everything from tampering with evidence to murdering witnesses willing to testify in court.  And because they’re “blue,” they’re more likely going to get away with it.  Furthermore, corrupt officers and crime lords attempt to break the will of Black folks who challenge corruption by targeting their support system. The majority of the officers Luke encounter, for instance, utilize their resources and information against the superhero’s support system. Cornell “Cottonmouth” Stokes exercises similar tactics when Luke dismantles his business.  If he remains silent about Cottonmouth’s crimes or dismantle his support system by framing him either murder or vandalism, the powers that be would ultimately break his spirit.

This incessant need to control Luke’s personal power is one of the reasons why the NYPD harass young Black and Brown men in “Take It Personal.”  In that episode, Luke is framed for a cop’s murder and the cops go off and shake down every single person who might look like a Luke Cage supporter. This is similar to the stop and frisk program that once went down in New York City some years back. Black and Brown people (mainly young Black and Latino men) are stopped at random and frisk by officers.  The said officers would then claim that the person “looked suspicious” though there is no proof.  This discriminatory practice continued until it is considered unconstitutional by Judge Shira Scheindlin in 2014.

And I bring up stop and frisk because knowing our rights against law enforcement and other industrial complexes is yet another precaution we Black folks have to take.  We’re often targeted and/or murdered by various industrial complexes, so being armed with information needs to be a requirement in order to stay alive.  Do you know you’re not obligated to speak to the police?  Or allow them to search your property without a warrant? Or even let them hold your attention?  If you said “No,” unfortunately, you’re not alone because it’s common.

The cops acknowledge that many folks aren’t aware of their legal rights, so the former employs intimidation to invoke fear and compliance.  But if those apprehended know the necessary information, then the fear tactics will be ineffective. This is why I love the interaction between a detective and Lonnie—the son of Patricia, a single mother going to law school to become a lawyer. While being interrogated at the precinct by the officer, the teen informs him of the illegalities of him being detained without the presence of his mother, which is illegal.

And did so with confidence (Thanks Patricia!).

That scene is important because the writers are demonstrating for the Black audience how to use knowledge against government-sanctioned oppressors. Not everyone is blessed with a parent who’s an aspiring attorney, so please educate yourself as much as possible. The more you know, the more confident you are when dealing with law enforcement.  And confidence reduces anxiety. Long story short, not only will self-education save your life, but it’s actually a form of self-care.

So is acknowledging sexual abuse and intergenerational trauma—another issue that the Luke Cage series covers very well.  Councilwoman Mariah Dillard is not only the member of a known crime family, but is a survivor of child sexual abuse. As a young girl, she is molested by her Uncle Pete, who still has access to her and Mama Mabel’s business until he is killed by teenage Cornell.

If y’all been watching the show, notice that Mariah’s offender isn’t punished on her behalf.  In fact, her molestation is swept under the rug as she’s sent off to a boarding school. On the surface Mama Mabel was trying to keep her safe. But by not removing Pete from the home and business, however, she basically blames Mariah for her perpetrator’s behavior. In real life, young Black women and young girls are usually held responsible for the sexual violence inflicted upon them.  And the offender is someone they know most likely, so they are going to show up at the house with impunity. Which is what happens to Mariah.  The moment Pete glances at her seductively, she averts her eyes away from his uncomfortably. Her body language suggests to the viewers that she wants nothing to do with her uncle’s advances, yet is most likely blamed her the man’s behavior thus receiving very little to adequate support. So it’s no wonder she snaps when her cousin Cottonmouth accuses her of enjoying her abuse.

Despite all she went through, Mariah is one of the strongest female characters I’ve ever known.  There are many think pieces about Luke and his political significance, but the women in the series are just as important.  Characters like Detective Mercedes “Misty” Knight, Claire Temple (my absolute favorite), Inspector Priscilla Ridley, and others are strong, intelligent, independent, resilient, street smart and so forth, utilizing their skills and inner resources as survival mechanisms (some of them work alongside Luke are accomplices in their own way).  These characters are no different from the real Black and Brown female activists who sacrifice their time, energy, freedom, and even their lives for the cause and their male comrades.

And, like real life female freedom fighters, these characters are accomplices to a fault. There’s this notion that women (Black women in particular) are to master their emotions at all times.  While pride is a wonderful trait to have, wearing an emotional shield continuously can also be our undoing.  The reason why Detective Knight almost loses her mind is because she thinks her vulnerability is the equivalent of lacking control–which places her in harm’s way psychologically.  Her mentality is a prime example of the Strong Black Woman stereotype that’s been forced upon Black women.  Again, there’s this reasoning that we’re strong, therefore we can handle anything thrown at us.  But that’s not true and it’s extremely tiring—as Detective Knight demonstrates.

As you can see, I love Luke Cage.  Its realism, complex characters, obvious admiration of Harlem for its identity and culture enriches the series.  For me, it’s more than a show about a Black superhero with unbreakable skin.  It mirrors the injustices Black people endure as a people and how corrupt industrial complexes attempt to annihilate our spirits—all to no avail.

Feeding the Monster: How Lena Dunham Manipulated the Black Media

 

Last week, my newsfeed was flooded with articles about Lena Dunham’s latest fuckery.
In her Lenny Letters, the actress and author accused New York Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham, Jr. of completely ignoring her at the Met Gala. Pouring her sexual frustrations to fellow White Feminist BFF Amy Schumer, Dunham wrote:

lena-dunham

While reading that letter, I immediately noticed her accusation derived from an encounter with Beckham that actually never occurred. The assumption that the athlete considered her a “dog” “child” and an “unfuckable It wearing a tux” was all a figment of Dunham’s imagination interwoven with deep-seeded insecurities.  Dunham’s foolishness was the hot topic throughout the Black media. For at least a week or longer, Black feminist journalists and bloggers composed extensive thinkpieces about her, her White feminist ideologies, how they perpetuate racism as she used them to play the helpless White female victim. Online activists dragged her for filth for being uneducated about the history of Black men and boys losing their lives due to false accusations made by White women.

I myself followed the controversy and even recorded an opinion video about it on YouTube. To be honest, I usually don’t fuck with Dunham because her creepy antics make my entire spirit break out into hives. Like, for real, my stomach cramped the entire time I wrote this piece. But the nonsense she pulled this past week exposed her lack of sincerity and usual tactics to gain exposure from the media—this time it being the Black media.

When Blavity posted an article argued that Dunham’s apology should matter (regardless of her intentions), I was too through and so were a few others. Quite frankly, it doesn’t and it never will. This past debacle was not the first time Dunham did or said something out of pocket. Fact, if y’all examine her relationship with the media, y’all notice a disturbing yet consistent pattern:

  1. Dunham does/says something she ain’t got no business saying/doing
  2. People catch Dunham doing something she ain’t got no business saying/doing
  3. She posts a “Sorry for fucking up/it was just a joke” type of statement on one of her websites
  4. Said statement is then redistributed by various media outlets,
  5. Articles about Dunham oversaturate the media for a certain period
  6. Media attention dies down
  7. Dunham gets bored and does/says something stupid
  8. Repeat

This sequence alone is one of many reasons Dunham’s apology to Beckham means nothing to me. She clearly thrives on negative publicity because her mediocrity doesn’t generate the public’s interest. Therefore, she resorts to starting some unnecessary bullshit. Think about it: Since the debut of her HBO hit, “Girls,” Dunham was featured on the cover of magazines, newspaper articles, feminist blogs hailing her as the “New Face of Feminism.” In exchange, she gobbled up the attention while using her fame as an opportunity to promote her definition of feminism, body politics, male privilege, and the right for women to embrace their weirdness. Her Euro-centric rhetoric soon earned her the admiration of young White women and second wave feminists. She eventually befriended Taylor Swift and Amy Schumer and the three joined forces to form the Becky Squad.

After a while, though, the media’s interest slowly began waning and eventually it traveled on the next shiny. And like most attention mongers, Dunham discovered a logical solution to her dilemma: Controversy.

And plenty of it.

Hence the circuses involving her memoir, Not That Kind of Girl and other exhibitions of inappropriate behavior—the infamous Odell Beckham Lenny Letter included.

To be honest, this recent stunt was the worst Dunham pulled in a good while. Considering the social climate involving racism and Black liberation, it was only fair for Black journalists to drag her all up and down these streets. But by directing all this attention on Dunham, I also wonder if we did our outlets and target audience a great disservice. She was the topic of discussion for an entire week, which was more than enough time. And since drama is her life’s blood, Black media publications unknowingly supplied Dunham with the negative, yet bountiful attention she survives on. Please note that I’m not saying that we shouldn’t express outrage when one of our own is disrespected. I’m only pointing out that, by focusing on her for as long as we have, we literally deprived well-deserving Black folks of media exposure from which they could’ve benefited.

Long story short, Dunham is a delusional, mediocre, self-centered, mayo-skinned, Euro-centric, attention-seeking parasite constantly feeding off self-inflicted drama. An emotional manipulator who attempts to mask her racism with humor and forced quirkiness. When called out on her bullshit by those who know better, Dunham immediately composes some half-baked, self-absorbed apology statement for the world to swallow. In reality, she has no intention of checking her privilege, let alone hold herself accountable for her disturbing behavior.  She really deserves nothing else from us–extended periods of media from Black journalists.

That’s why I cease feeding the monster that is Lena Dunham after this article. She’s doing nothing to earn redemption from those she’s harmed (her sister Grace especially) and had attempted to dehumanize people of color more than once. She influences Schumer and Swift to use their fame to present themselves as targets for angry Black men. So for me to throw any additional attention towards that human waste of everything would deplete my time, energy, and intelligence. And if we all stop paying attention to her, then maybe she’ll wither and disappear.
And rightfully so.